How UNICEF works in the community in Mozambique

In order to learn how UNICEF works in the community in Mozambique, we have attended several meetings—not only with the local district authorities but also with partners like a local radio station and a police officer focusing on domestic violence. The most interesting for me was meeting with a school council of school employees, religious leaders and parents. Even one of the students was a member of this school council.

School council boy
School council boy

It was very interesting to hear what the council said about the support from UNICEF. He told us that he was very proud of the schools, and the biggest difference was that the school now belongs to the community and not to the teachers and principals. Personally, I think it’s really great that they are changing the way of thinking. Now they’re thinking more of how to make it better in the long term and not only day by day. Now they have well-trained teachers who follow the child-friendly programme. Not only the school councellor, but even teachers and some students were very thankful for UNICEF’s support, and you could tell that they knew a lot about how much we support them.

School council
School council

Then we got an invitation to a mobile educational theatre in a nearby village. Mobile units are present in 190 locations and in eight provinces in Mozambique. There were a lot of children in the schoolyard. For me it was very intense to watch the theatre and the documentary shown afterward because the message was so basic and obvious. The main topic of the documentary was the importance of girls’ education. One generation ago, girls weren’t allowed to go to school, and if they did they got a bad reputation. But now it is finally starting to change, and girls are as welcome in school as boys are. Probably it needs at least another generation to become more common, but at least it’s a start.

Theatre
Theatre

In that yard they also had a tent, sponsored by UNICEF, where anyone who wants can get tested for HIV and get health support and information about this virus.

children

 

 

English
    Hanna Widell